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Review NReal Light Affordable AR Wear

Review NReal Light Affordable AR Wear

Review NReal Light Affordable AR Wear

This post offers a snapshot media clip and Review NReal Light Affordable AR Wear.

In summary, eyewear needs additional work with a promising future and a growing audience of the user base.

The writer claims the following key information:

Moreover, claims include, Affordable, display content in front of the wearer’s eyes, upgraded version finally hit the market,

now works when directly plugged into a smartphone.

A more refined software ecosystem, with more augmented reality things to do.

With visuals pushed out onto the bottom of the glasses, which house two micro-OLED screens, are then reflected back to the wearer’s line of vision.

As with our reviews, you should conduct your own research into this product and the claims made by the owner or distributor.

Two years ago, I met Chi Xu, the founder of Beijing startup nReal, just as he was about to fly overseas to unveil his company’s AR (augmented reality) glasses to the world at two high-profile trade shows: the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas and Mobile World Congress in Barcelona.

His product was promising: a lightweight and relatively affordable pair of glasses that can display content in front of the wearer’s eyes. The semi-transparent nature of the footage make it look as if a hologram graphic was being projected into the real world.

Think the graphic overlays that Tony Stark sees floating in front of his face when he’s in his Iron Man suit. At least that was the promise. The product I tested at the time was a gen-one prototype that never saw wide commercial release, and the things I could do with the glasses were very limited—I watched a video that floated in front of my face and moved around the scene as I moved my head, and I played a generic shooting game that didn’t really take advantage of the real world environment—it was merely projecting graphics onto, say, a wall, or a sofa.

Last fall, however, an improved, upgraded version finally hit the market, including the crucial and lucrative US market, as well as Japan and other regions. This commercial version has a more comfortable fit thanks to a flexible arm hinge (so it doesn’t wrap around the wearer’s head as tightly), and it now works when directly plugged into a smartphone, while the previous version I tested needed an additional box with a dedicated CPU. But most promising of all was a more refined software ecosystem, with more augmented reality things to do.

I have been testing this new nReal Light for the past month, and there’s good news and bad news. Bad news first: the AR elements are still underwhelming, but the good news? This is a really immersive way to consume media, particularly when I cover up the glasses with the included lens cap. Doing so blocks out the “real world,” so whatever content is beaming in front of my eyes are broadcast on a vast black screen. It’s like having a personal movie theater screen in front of my face.

This is really hard to show via product photos, and the photos below do not do the nReal Light justice. Rest assured that to my eyes, the footage on the screen covers almost my entire field of vision, and video quality, while not as sharp as if I were watching directly on a brilliant smartphone screen, is sharp enough, at 1080p. The trick to the nReal Light is that it isn’t actually projecting visuals outwards (like a traditional projector), instead visuals are pushed out onto the bottom of the glasses, which house two micro-OLED screens, which are then reflected back to the wearer’s line of vision. Because of this, I find that I can only wear the nReal Light for about 30 minutes at a time before my eyes start feeling strains, perhaps from having something reflected to my eyeballs just a few centimeters away.

All data is taken from the source: http://forbes.com

Article Link: https://www.forbes.com/sites/bensin/2…

Gary Black

Masters' Degree in Science May 2018. Consulting, partnering with others through technology will help communities across the world.
“I write to discover what I know”- Flannery O’Connor

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